Verse written on her Death Bed

Here is the work we have done in Literature class. I worked with Tota Lupi.

Overview

This is a beautiful and moving poem filled with the romance of a woman who feels she has truly found her soul mate.

Read the poem

Thou who dost all my worldly thoughts employ,
Thou pleasing source of all my earthly joy,
Thou tenderest husband and thou dearest friend,
To thee this first, this last adieu I send!
At length the conqueror death asserts his right,
And will for ever veil me from thy sight;
He wooes me to him with a cheerful grace,
And not one terror clouds his meagre face;
He promises a lasting rest from pain,
And shews that all life’s fleeting joys are vain;
Th’ eternal scenes of heaven he sets in view,
And tells me that no other joys are true.
But love, fond love, would yet resist his power,
Would fain awhile defer the parting hour;
He brings thy mourning image to my eyes,
And would obstruct my journey to the skies.
But say, thou dearest, thou unwearied friend!
Say, should’st thou grieve to see my sorrows end?
Thou know’st a painful pilgrimage I’ve past;
And should’st thou grieve that rest is come at last?
Rather rejoice to see me shake off life,
And die as I have liv’d, thy faithful wife.

Mary Monck (?-1715)

Work in pairs and include:

-data about the writer and context of production

-whether this poem is based on her  life or not

-themes and tones

-literary devices used by the poet to put across her message

-personal conclusion on the poem 

Monck, Mary, a woman of great beauty and considerable poetical abilities, daughter of Lord Molesworth, was born in the latter half of the 17th century. She acquired an intimate knowledge of Latin, Italian, and Spanish literature. Chiefly residing in the country, one of a numerous family, she cultivated poetry more as an amusement than with a view to publication. She married George Monck of Dublin. After her early death from consumption, at Bath, in 1715, a volume of her poems and translations was published. Several of her pieces are given in Cibber’s Lives of the Poets. 

The poem was written in 1715 in the end of enlightenment and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The poem is based on her life. She writes it in her death bed, as a farewell to her husband in 1715. However the poem was not published in that year, only after her death was any of her poetry published. The themes are companionship and friendship, rather than lust and passion since the poem is about true love. Also we see the impact of aging and mortality. The tone is generally soothing and gentle, with occasional emotional outbursts.

As for literary devices, the repetition of ‘all’ emphasises the fact that the husband is the only person in her life. We have an analogy presenting her struggle with illness as a war with death personified as a ‘conqueror’. She contrasts the ‘fleeting joys’ of life with the ‘eternal scenes of heaven’ in an attempt to convince herself and her husband that death should hold no fear and thus be welcomed.

Mary writes this poem to show all the love she felt for her husband, her best friend and companion. The poem is a farewell to the love of her life. She is writting this poem in sadness about leaving and being mortal, but at the same time the poem is a way to demonstrate to her husband how she loved him.

Virtual Period

-choose a song that deals with the same topic, find a video and analyse it.

-Post it in your blog

Video: Goodbye my lover by James Blunt

We chose this song because we realised that both the song and poem are about a farewell to a lower, friend, etc. James Blunt says goodbye through a singed poem to his former lover, where as Mary Monck leaves written words to her husband to say her goodbyes.

Letter from Napoleon’s Coronation

Task: imagine you are a person who attended Napoleon’s coronation as Emperor. Write a letter to a friend describing it and expressing your opinion about it. Inworked with Tota Lupi.

Dear Anette,
Today I attended Napoleon’s coronation.
It took place at Notre Dame, the cathedral is on a small island on the River Seine. People from all around the world come to Paris to admire the beauty of this French landmark. Thousands of frenchmen had gathered for the coronation. Inside the cathedral we could barely breathe because of all the people who came to witness this great event.

Priests, counselors and the Pope stood in the
alter at the sides of our great Emperor. When Napoleon lifted his crown the entire cathedral held it’s breath and as he laid it upon his head we all applauded and shouted his name with pride. Then came the coronation of his wife Josephine who wore the most beautiful gown I had ever seen and the brightest jewels France had ever seen.

With Napoleon as our Emperor I could not
be prouder of being French. I am sure his rule will make our country become one and all of us together will make France the greatest Nation Europe has ever witnessed. He has already proven to me he can accomplish great things with the new Constitution he wrote for all of France to by ruled by. He has released us from tax farmers and banned trade unions. By this, people will know that the money is not being stolen by the tax farmers, but actually going to the crown’s hands to be used for the countrymen’s benefit.

Long live Napoleon and his wife Josephine!

Sir Joseph.

Soldier, Rest! … And other poems

For this weeks Literature virtual period our teacher gave us the following assignment.

  1. Check out the following page: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/articles/70139/the-poetry-of-world-war-i
  2. Absolution by Siegfried Sassoon 

The anguish of the earth absolves our eyes 

Till beauty shines in all that we can see. 

War is our scourge; yet war has made us wise, 

And, fighting for our freedom, we are free.

 

Horror of wounds and anger at the foe, 

And loss of things desired; all these must pass. 

We are the happy legion, for we know 

Time’s but a golden wind that shakes the grass.

 

There was an hour when we were loth to part 

From life we longed to share no less than others. 

Now, having claimed this heritage of heart, 

What need we more, my comrades and my brothers? 

The title of the poem is Absolution, which means “formal release from guilt, obligation, or punishment”. I believe that the choice of word for the title makes reference to the fact that he was seeking a release from war, he didn’t want to fight anymore.
In this poem Sassoon, who fought in World War 1, is parting to the front line with his comrades. On the first stanza he gives name to all the things that have to happen before the war he is fighting ends. Which for him would be a long time as he believed that the war was being prolonged by the government. In this first stanza he also names the things he fights for, his freedom for example. On the second stanza he shows with simple vocabulary some of the few things that happen during war, the wounds, the anger, the loss of friends and time. Finally in the third stanza he asks his comrades, if there is anything else that they need, they will have everything waiting for them in their return, and when they are gone they will each other.
3. Compare it to “Soldier, Rest!” 
These two poems are very different. Mainly becuase Absolution is poem that takes place during the war, in which we can see soldiers parting to the front line, and where the author mentions what war involves, the feelings of the soldiers, and others. But “Soldier, Rest!” is a poem about death in war.  In which the author is telling the soldier that he does not have to worry about fighting, bullets, waking up in the middle of the night to hear the sound of weapons, because now he will “Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking”. The being the main difference in the poems, we also see that both authors come from different centuries, and have different vocabularies. Sassoon, uses more simple vocabulary, and Scott uses a more vulgar, but not in a bad way, kind of vocabulary. He uses words as if he were a soldier talking to another comrade, telling that he does not have to worry about war anylonger, he may sleep forever.
4. Illustrate it with pictures and explain which different parts of the poem they illustrate.

This picture shows the main events of war

Here we can see what parting for soldiers was like. In the back of the picture we read “new hope” that is what they seeked the most.

Ensayo sobre la mujer

En nuestra clase de Literatura estuvimos leyendo sobre las hermanas Ocampo y su rol en la Literatura como mujeres. En base a esto nuestra profesora nos pidió que escribiéramos un ensayo sobre la debilidad de la mujer.

El diccionario de la Real Academia Española define el “sexo débil” como un conjunto de mujeres. ¿Por qué es esto? ¿Por que después de tantos años seguimos siendo considerando a la mujer “el sexo débil”? ¿Somos realmente al sexo débil, o es sólo una creencia la cual hemos convertido en realidad?

Si retrocedemos en el tiempo, Europa por ejemplo en el siglo 19, podemos decir que la mujer tenía muy pocos derechos, casi ninguno comparado con las mujeres de este siglo. Se quedaba en la casa, se ocupaba de la educación de sus hijos, se dedicaba a la cocina y limpieza de su hogar, no tenía salida laboral, mucho menos derecho al voto.

La mujer era tratada como un ser inferior, el hombre. Yo creo que nos convertimos en al sexo débil, el momento en al que le permitimos el hombre tomar decisiones por nosotras, en el momento en el que dijimos “si” en vez de “no”. En el pasado la mujer no tomaba decisiones en lo que respectaba su propia vida, y así fue que muchos hombres aprovecharon para hacernos sentirnos débiles, inferiores, y tomar control de nuestra vida como si no nos fuera propia.

Hoy en día la mujer es más libre que aquella que vivió en al pasado. Esto en parte se debe a que algunos hombres nos permitieron tener una voz, decir lo que pensamos, tomar nuestras propias decisiones. Pero también en parte se debe a que decidimos ser fuertes, más fuertes que nuestros opresores, y tomar las riendas de nuestro propio camino.

Si hablamos de la biología del hombre y de la mujer, podemos decir que al hombre es un ser más fuerte que la mujer. Físicamente al hombre es más fuerte y robusto que la mujer, es menos fuerte y delicada que el. Pero hoy en día ya no podemos decir estas cosas. La mujer ha demostrado ser igual o más fuerte que el hombre muchas veces.

Por último podemos hablar de la salida laboral que se le presenta a ambos géneros. Un empresario a la hora de tomar un nuevo empleado, y tener que tomar la decisión entre un hombre y una mujer, va a elegir al hombre. Pero no va a tomar esta elección porque uno esté mejor capacitado que el otro, sino por la cantidad de dinero que le costará tener un empleado masculino, y otro femenino

Si la mujer fuera a ser tomada como empleada en una empresa, y quedara embarazada, tendría que tomar una licencia de nueves a doce meses, para cuidar de su hijo, mientras que si al hombre fuera a tener un hijo, sólo tomaría una licencia de tres meses. A un empleador, que debe pagar un salario mensual a sus trabajadores, le conviene contratar a un hombre, con el cual no corre un riesgo de licencia tan alto como la mujer.

¿Podemos decir que somos más débiles por tener menos derechos, menor fuerza, o menor salida laboral? No, no podemos. Las mujeres no somos más débiles que al hombre, pero si tenemos una vida más complicada y más obstaculizada que el. No todos somos iguales, todos tenemos nuestras diferencias, estas nos pueden hacer más fuertes o débiles, pero nadie nos puede decir que somos débiles, por ser mujeres.

Virtual Period: Analysing “I find no peace”

For our weekly Virtual Period our teacher Literature teacher gave us this assignment to analyse the following poem,

I Find no Peace BY SIR THOMAS WYATT

I find no peace, and all my war is done.

I fear and hope. I burn and freeze like ice.

I fly above the wind, yet can I not arise;

And nought I have, and all the world I season.

That loseth nor locketh holdeth me in prison

And holdeth me not—yet can I scape no wise—

Nor letteth me live nor die at my device,

And yet of death it giveth me occasion.

Without eyen I see, and without tongue I plain.

I desire to perish, and yet I ask health.

I love another, and thus I hate myself.

I feed me in sorrow and laugh in all my pain;

Likewise displeaseth me both life and death,

And my delight is causer of this strife.

 

1.What situation is the speaker reflecting on?

He isfighting  the  feelings towards a woman that is not his. He already has one who he already loves, but there is also another one, and this conflict between both women and being in love with two people at the same time makes him suffer. Nothing can put him out of the misery of loving two women.

2. What metaphors and similes does he use to express his feelings?

He uses metaphors and similies like: “I burn and freeze like ice.” And he also uses “I desire to perish, and yet I ask health.” Among others. These two are examples that show the wirter using metaphors to express the contradictory feelings he has for both women.

3. How many separate paradoxes are in the poem?

There are 10 paradoex throughout the poem.

4. What is the cumulative effect of so many paradoxes?

So many paradoxes in the poem show that the voice in the poem is in love, but hates himself for it, and has many mixed feelings about his lovers. He is confused, but in love.

5. What is the general topic of the paradoxes in lines 1-4?

The general topic in lines 1-4 is nature. The writer uses many expressions involving nature itlself, and other paradoxes are about the feelings of human beings. For example “I fear and hope. I burn and freeze like ice.”

6. What is the general topic of the paradoxes in lines 5-8?

The general topic in these lines is improsnment, or isolation. The voice is not physically improsoned but he is a prisoner of his feelings towards the two women he loves.

7. Why does the speaker in line 11 declare that hating himself is the consequence of loving another?

He hates himself becuase he loves another, this is because he feels guilty of loving two women at the same time. The fact he is in love with two people makes him hate himself. Because he will end up hurting someone, who he loves, and this will also hurt him.

8. Why is it ironic that his “delight” is the “causer of this strife”?

Because when we are delighted by something, we are not supposed to suffer for enjoying it. But for the voice, his delight, causes him pain and suffering.

9. To what extent do you think the paradoxes are an accurate expression of the feelings of a person in love, particularly in light of the fact that in the 16th century the completely free and unchaperoned meetings of lovers were not easily arranged?

I believe that this paradoxes are a clear expression of what being in love, and with two people at the same time is. Back in the 16th century it was very difficult to be married and have a lover, so for him it must be hell. We see how hard it is for him to be in love with two women in the poem, with all the paradoxes he uses.

10. To what extent do the paradoxes capture the agonies of the speaker?

The paradoxes capture the speaker’s agonies perfectly. Through them we see all his pleasures, delights, but also his pain and suffering. We see how badly he feels for loving two people at the same time.

Then, prepare an animation using Animoto to illustrate this poem with pictures.

Jacobins and Girondins

For this weeks Virtual Period our Hisotry teacher gave us this assignment:

Find a picture that best represents the Girondins and one that best represents the Jacobins. Give the characteristics of each group at the beginning of the French Revolution. The due date is June, 9th. 

Jacobins: 

  • Formed in Paris
  • Left-wing revolutionary politics
  • They were relatively moderate in their demands, but they soon became more extreme
  • Supported Louis XVI execution
  • Jacobins clubs were later organized in provinces too and served as debating societies
  • Allies to the sans-culottes, popular work force of working-class Parisians
  • Supported the rights of property, presented a much more middle-class position

Girondins:

  • They came from the South of France
  • Supported the rights of provinces to influence the revolutionary movement
  • Encouraged negotiation with Louis XVI
  • Campaigned for the end of the monarchy
  • The Girondin leader was Jacques-Pierre Brissot

Poem: Rooms

In our Literature class we read the poem “Rooms” and had to analyse it.

Rooms

BY CHARLOTTE MEW

I remember rooms that have had their part

     In the steady slowing down of the heart.

The room in Paris, the room at Geneva,

The little damp room with the seaweed smell,

And that ceaseless maddening sound of the tide—

     Rooms where for good or for ill—things died.

But there is the room where we (two) lie dead,

Though every morning we seem to wake and might just as well seem to sleep again

     As we shall somewhere in the other quieter, dustier bed

     Out there in the sun—in the rain.

Answer the following questions

1. Read about the writer.

Make notes about her life and about what may have influenced her writings.  Why is it said that the life of the writer was a tragedy?

Haunted by unrequited passion and tormemted by fears of madness, but she still managed to write great poems of passion and beauty. She loved most.of her life in poverty. She hated the fact that she was mad. But this led her to write great poems about unrequitted love, she wrote about death as a place where we could finally find love and serenity.

2. Read the poem: how are “rooms” described?

Each rooms describes a moment in her life. A relationship that ended. A trip or a disease. Every now and then, she goes back to those rooms that are in her head and remebers what it felt like to be in love, or sick. She has rooms from Paris and Geneva. Rooms in the beach, or rooms for when she was sick. There is one room where she and her lover died, where their relationship ended, and they both lay dead now.

3. “The poem offers us a poignant account of loss as qualified through the depiction of abandoned rooms. Rooms are the physical means to which relationships are developed and consecrated. It entails intimacy and love, as well as abandon and death. It shelters individuals, as well as couples, from the harshness of the natural elements outside, providing them with a private and cosy space. There is also a sense of shifting dependence as the couples travel from room to room, leaving their trails behind and simultaneously having images of the abandoned rooms imprinted upon their memories.”

Account for this with quotation from the poem

– “Though every morning we seem to wake and might just as well seem to sleep again”

This quote makes reference to the intimacy and love the room they died in represented, and also makes reference to abandonment and death.

– “As we shall somewhere in the other quieter, dustier bed. Out there in the sun—in the rain” 

 This quote shows a sense of shifting dependence as the couples travel from room to room, leaving their trails behind and simultaneously having images of the abandoned rooms imprinted upon their memories.

4. The poem begins “I remember”. What does this tell you about the voice? And the tone?

The fact that the poem begins with “I remember” tells me that the voice is remeniscing her past, visiting her rooms, her past, and she does this with a nostalgic and melancholic tone.

5. What is the theme in your opinion? What is the tone?

The themes in this poem are Love, Wisdom and Age.

Virtual period Activity (Deadline: May 15)

Read the following poem and compare and contrast it to “Rooms”  in terms of style, language and form, paying special attention to their portrayal of abandoned rooms.

Home is so Sad
by Philip Larkin

Home is so sad. It stays as it was left,
Shaped to the comfort of the last to go
As if to win them back. Instead, bereft
Of anyone to please, it withers so,
Having no heart to put aside the theft

And turn again to what it started as,
A joyous shot at how things ought to be,
Long fallen wide. You can see how it was:
Look at the pictures and the cutlery.
The music in the piano stool. That vase.

POSTER

 

The Storming of the Bastille

As we have been seeing the French Revolution and all the causes that came along with it, for this week we had as a virtual period the following task:

Imagine you are a French citizen who was involved in the storming of the Bastille. Later that night, write your diary entry, explaining what happened (from your viewpoint) and expressing your fears, wishes, hopes for the future, etc. Be as creative as possible in finding a voice for that character to make it sound realistic.

Dear Diary,

I have waited for this day a long time. When the Assembly gathered last week and finally decided that it was time to take over the Bastille, not only to release our fellows but also to take the weapons that would help us defeat the monarchy I felt relieved and free. Because now we were giving ourselves the chance to become a democracy, to draw  a Constitution, and make our way though life.

We decided the attack would take place with the first rays of light. The whole Assembly was there, even the nobles who had shown their support and now were leading us to our freedom from this feudal system.

It didn’t take long for us to walk in the Bastille and take the weapons, as well as our fellows. Most of them were in shock. They couldn’t believe we were finally begining a Revolution. I couldn’t belive either. When I first came to realise what was happening was when I saw the warden’s head on a pike.

This day will forever remain in history and I’m happy to be a French, and I am thrilled to be a part of this Revolution.